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Archive: October, 2018
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Sgt. Christopher Castillo, a mIlitary Working Dog handler with the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, stands with his partner, Raider, aboard the amphibious assault ship USS Wasp (LHD 1), underway in the South China Sea, Oct. 1, 2018. Castillo, a native of Cororan, California, graduated from Corcoran High School in June 2008 before enlisting as a military policeman in March 2014. MWD handlers support the 31st MEU during training in garrison in Okinawa, Japan and while underway aboard the amphibious assault ship USS Wasp (LHD 1). MWD handlers have supported Marine Corps amphibious operations since WWII - their partners, man's best friend, have saved countless lives during the decades across the globe. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Gunnery Sgt. T. T. Parish/Released) - Sgt. Christopher Castillo, a mIlitary Working Dog handler with the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, stands with his partner, Raider, aboard the amphibious assault ship USS Wasp (LHD 1), underway in the South China Sea, Oct. 1, 2018. Castillo, a native of Cororan, California, graduated from Corcoran High School in June 2008 before enlisting as a military policeman in March 2014. MWD handlers support the 31st MEU during training in garrison in Okinawa, Japan and while underway aboard the amphibious assault ship USS Wasp (LHD 1). MWD handlers have supported Marine Corps amphibious operations since WWII - their partners, man's best friend, have saved countless lives during the decades across the globe. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Gunnery Sgt. T. T. Parish/Released)

Marines with Bulk Fuel Company, 9th Engineer Support Battalion, 3rd Marine Logistics Group, unreel a fuel hose from the back of a Medium Tactical Vehicle Replacement 7-ton truck during fuel support operations training Oct. 2, 2018 at Camp Hansen, Okinawa, Japan. The Marines unrolled the hose to connect the fuel site and the fuel pump to distribute water, which is used during training evolutions instead of fuel, through the lines. The bulk fuel specialists assembled fuel sites at Camp Hansen in order to practice fueling support operations for upcoming exercises and deployments. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Armando Elizalde) - Marines with Bulk Fuel Company, 9th Engineer Support Battalion, 3rd Marine Logistics Group, unreel a fuel hose from the back of a Medium Tactical Vehicle Replacement 7-ton truck during fuel support operations training Oct. 2, 2018 at Camp Hansen, Okinawa, Japan. The Marines unrolled the hose to connect the fuel site and the fuel pump to distribute water, which is used during training evolutions instead of fuel, through the lines. The bulk fuel specialists assembled fuel sites at Camp Hansen in order to practice fueling support operations for upcoming exercises and deployments. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Armando Elizalde)

SUBIC BAY, Republic of the Philippines (Oct. 02, 2018) Staff Sgt. Gerardo Santos, assigned to the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU), signals an AAV-P7/A1 assault amphibious vehicle inside the well deck of the amphibious dock landing ship USS Ashland (LSD 48). Ashland, part of the Wasp Amphibious Ready Group, participates in KAMANDAG 2 a military training exercise led by Philippines between the Armed Forces of the Philippines and U.S. military, along with participants from the Japan Self-Defense Force featuring military-to-military exchanges through various training events, capabilities development training, and humanitarian and civic assistance projects. KAMANDAG is an acronym for the Filipino phrase “Kaagapay Ng Mga Mandirigma Ng Dagat,” which translates to “Cooperation of Warriors of the Sea,” highlighting the partnership between the Philippine and United States Militaries. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Joshua Mortensen) - SUBIC BAY, Republic of the Philippines (Oct. 02, 2018) Staff Sgt. Gerardo Santos, assigned to the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU), signals an AAV-P7/A1 assault amphibious vehicle inside the well deck of the amphibious dock landing ship USS Ashland (LSD 48). Ashland, part of the Wasp Amphibious Ready Group, participates in KAMANDAG 2 a military training exercise led by Philippines between the Armed Forces of the Philippines and U.S. military, along with participants from the Japan Self-Defense Force featuring military-to-military exchanges through various training events, capabilities development training, and humanitarian and civic assistance projects. KAMANDAG is an acronym for the Filipino phrase “Kaagapay Ng Mga Mandirigma Ng Dagat,” which translates to “Cooperation of Warriors of the Sea,” highlighting the partnership between the Philippine and United States Militaries. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Joshua Mortensen)

MV-22B Osprey’s assigned to Medium Tiltrotor Squadron 268 (VMM-268) are parked on the flight line during a homecoming event for VMM-268, Marine Corps Base Hawaii (MCBH), Sept. 28, 2018. VMM-268 has been deployed to Australia for Marine Rotational Force Darwin for the past 6 months. During this rotation, they participated in numerous training exercises in and around Australia with various Indo-Pacific partners and allies. III Marine Expeditionary Forces in Hawaii are ready, capable, and relevant. The a trans-Pacific flights conducted by Marine Aircraft Group 24 have shrunk the theater significantly, allowing the Marine Corps to aggregate combat force in the western Pacific from Hawaii in a matter of days. U.S. Marine Corps Forces in Hawaii are now part of the strategic calculus in a ‘fight tonight’ scenario. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Matthew Kirk) - MV-22B Osprey’s assigned to Medium Tiltrotor Squadron 268 (VMM-268) are parked on the flight line during a homecoming event for VMM-268, Marine Corps Base Hawaii (MCBH), Sept. 28, 2018. VMM-268 has been deployed to Australia for Marine Rotational Force Darwin for the past 6 months. During this rotation, they participated in numerous training exercises in and around Australia with various Indo-Pacific partners and allies. III Marine Expeditionary Forces in Hawaii are ready, capable, and relevant. The a trans-Pacific flights conducted by Marine Aircraft Group 24 have shrunk the theater significantly, allowing the Marine Corps to aggregate combat force in the western Pacific from Hawaii in a matter of days. U.S. Marine Corps Forces in Hawaii are now part of the strategic calculus in a ‘fight tonight’ scenario. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Matthew Kirk)